Spanish Colonial Art Museum Culinary Tour
Private Vault Culinary Experience

Santa Fe Tapas executed by our Chef Marianne Sundquist

Private Collection Tour provided by the Museum

Indulge exclusively in this historic home and museum with your private group to unveil the historic classifications of the 18 styles of Spanish Colonial Art.

4 Tiered Pricing for Lunch & Dinner Variety to suit your festive occasion | 8 person minimum


A private culinary experience like no other. Nestled in museum hill, the 1930 Pueblo-Spanish Revival Director’s Residence is the only residential building open to the public that was designed by one of Santa Fe’s most prominent architects, John Gaw Meem. mingle and dine in a world-class historic home & museum.

The Spanish Colonial Arts Society collects, preserves, and exhibits the Spanish Colonial art of new mexico and beyond, and educates the public about its related cultures and living traditions.

Vivac Culinary

santa fe TAPAS MENU

THE MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART

Cocktail Party 

a seasonal selection of spanish inspired cheese, charcuterie, fruit, vegetables & accompaniments

$185 per person

add sparkling, white, red wine variety $20 per person/per hour

New Mexico Tapas Lunch

a casual one course array of Spanish style tapas, celebrating the beauty of Southwest ingredients

with ice tea or water—$210/person

with ice tea, water, 1 glass of wine per guest—$230/person

(one course with a variety of tapas style tastes on a single plate & good choice for groups with limited time schedule)

Three Course Lunch

a three course tasting of Spanish tapas, celebrating the beauty of Southwest ingredients

with ice tea or water—$250/person

with ice tea or water, 1 glass of wine per guest—$270/person

with ice tea or water, tasting of 3 wines—$300/person

Four Course Dinner

a four course tasting of Spanish tapas, celebrating the beauty of Southwest ingredients

with ice tea or water—$275/person

with ice tea or water, 1 glass of wine per guest—$295/person

with ice tea or water, tasting of 4 wines—$350/person

Additional Fees

Gratuity: 20%

The 1930 Pueblo-Spanish Revival Directors Residence is the only residential building open to the public that was designed by one of Santa Fe’s most prominent architects, John Gaw Meem. The structure was built with single and double-wide Penitentiary hollow-tile blocks, not adobe bricks, as a more permanent material that was hand-sculpted to appear to be made of earth. Meem, along with Isaac Hamilton Rapp and Mary Coulter, were instrumental in the definition and development of our unique santa fe style architecture.

Placement of this residence within the landscape is oriented toward Sun Mountain to the east, which is appreciated immediately upon entering the front door with views through the window wall in the east portal. The building with its furnishings has been accessioned into the Society’s permanent collections with catalog number 1999.011.

The Director’s Residence was constructed by the Museum of New Mexico on the Camino Lejo campus to house the director of the Laboratory of Anthropology. Photographs taken in the 1940s show how the house was used. A breakfast area was located at the north end of the east portal and the living room was large enough to accommodate dancing with music played on the grand piano. Later the historic residence was owned by the School of American Research, now known as the School for Advanced Research, where their director lived until the late 1990s. The 1998 gift of the property to the Society was intended for the establishment of a museum with facilities for display and storage of its collections. Fulfilling one of the goals in the 1929 articles of incorporation, the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art opened to the public in 2002 with the inaugural exhibition and catalog Conexiones.

Most of the historic residential building was repurposed for display galleries with staff offices in the former maid’s quarters and public restrooms in the former garage. Very little of the structure was altered, maintaining the intimate character of room sizes and retaining beautifully crafted woodwork.

The historic building that houses our display galleries, known as the Director’s Residence, is an outstanding example of Santa Fe’s Pueblo-Spanish Revival architectural style.  Our private tour experience highlights the basic tenets of Santa Fe Style, describes the influential architects and historians who formulated these design efforts that transformed the City, and examines the architectural features of this building, especially those Spanish-derived details that inspired the architect’s draftsmen. This vault houses our retablo (2-D saint painting and bulto (3-D saint sculpture)), tinwork, and precious metals collections. New Mexican wood panel retablos range from the late 18th century to contemporary Spanish Market examples. Mexican tin and copper plate retablos are also represented. The extensive tinwork collection is visible at a glance on wall-mounted screens. Precious metals are used primarily for jewelry and the filigree work is exquisite. Other luxury items and devotional accessories for personal and congregational activities are also represented.